Lively-Con-fess
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Documentary: Blue Gold: World Water Wars  http://www.bluegold-worldwaterwars.com/
Read about it: http://bit.ly/IDd2tP
Please take the time to read. 
Report I wrote on World Water Wars:
Should there be global standards that prevent companies from depleting natural resources?
Our planet is resilient, but that does not mean that it should be abused. The taking of natural resources from one place to another can cause moral and basic survival issues. People may end up dying of starvation or dehydration simply because they do not have the right to water.
 Water is a basic human right and should be treated as such; therefore it should not be left in the control of greedy corporations.
  Our planets water resources are rapidly depleting. A planet which used to have a large abundance of water is shrinking down to a nearly unsustainable eco-system. It is proposed in the documentary “Tapped” that by the year 2030 two thirds of the world will not have access to clean drinking water. This is not the only startling fact about the loss of our drinking water. A very small percentage of our planet has drinking water to begin with; roughly 1% of all water is suitable for drinking. An example of this desolation can be seen in the Aral Sea. Once a hot-spot for the fishing industry, it now lays as barren land. Only a small portion of the original Sea remains, it is now only a lake. This was caused by the re-location of water by the Soviets in 1969. They had decided to grow “white gold” (cotton), and used the seas water resources to do so. Displacement of the water stopped the natural cycle, and the sea has not been able to replenish. This is also happening closer to home. Building of dams stops water resources from carrying nutrients, as well as the shipment and distribution of bottled water. Industries are taking water from their natural inhabitants and leaving the soil barren. In order to send water to a place like Arizona, you must ship it there. However, since the land is dry the water will not go back into their eco system. This water is lost. Since there is no water to replenish the land in its original place, the crust becomes hard and where there used to be one desert, there are now two.
   The Chinese word for water also means control. In its own this is a good metaphor. Companies are using water as a means of control, not only for local industry, but for other nations. Smaller nations like Kenya (which is also one of the driest nations) are being bullied into selling their resources cheap to get out of debt. This debt has been created by the industries who will not allow them to have tariffs, or to sell at a fair price. Using this debt, the companies are able to take the water from Kenya. Within the United corporations are using a similar method to rights activists. “Slap Suits”, which are ridiculous claims used in order to sue the activist are brought to court. While the companies know they will not win these suits, the cost for lawyers for the activist acts as a deterrent. Unfortunately this method is legal.
   Fortunately, it is still possible to stop our world’s fresh water sources from depleting. The method is not complicated like the corporate back up plan of desalination (This process involves removing the salt from the ocean water and would require large amounts of fuel, and possibly even nuclear power). The answer is simply to allow the earth to regain its natural cycle. First you would have to stop all deportation of water, and allow people to revert back to a localized system of agriculture. This means that what we use will be recycled back into the earth. Secondly, in locations which have been previously destroyed the digging of wells can force water back into the ground and re-start the natural process. This can be also done through small dams which trick the water back into the ground. This process would not be costly.
corporate control is directly related to the depletion of our global water resources. They are abusing control, and convincing governments to bend to their will. They have been terrorizing activists, as well as entire nations. Their use of our resources results in nothing but a negative, and is solely for the purpose of money. “There is enough water for human need, not human greed.” – Mahatma Ghandi. The only people benefiting from this endeavour are the CEO’s who are pocketing the sizable incomes. In fifty years, there might not be any water to fight over. In order to protect our eco-systems it seems necessary that there be global law and standards which protect natural resources from exploitation for the greed of corporations, or privatized organizations.

Documentary: Blue Gold: World Water Wars  http://www.bluegold-worldwaterwars.com/

Read about it: http://bit.ly/IDd2tP

Please take the time to read. 

Report I wrote on World Water Wars:

Should there be global standards that prevent companies from depleting natural resources?
Our planet is resilient, but that does not mean that it should be abused. The taking of natural resources from one place to another can cause moral and basic survival issues. People may end up dying of starvation or dehydration simply because they do not have the right to water.
 Water is a basic human right and should be treated as such; therefore it should not be left in the control of greedy corporations.
  Our planets water resources are rapidly depleting. A planet which used to have a large abundance of water is shrinking down to a nearly unsustainable eco-system. It is proposed in the documentary “Tapped” that by the year 2030 two thirds of the world will not have access to clean drinking water. This is not the only startling fact about the loss of our drinking water. A very small percentage of our planet has drinking water to begin with; roughly 1% of all water is suitable for drinking. An example of this desolation can be seen in the Aral Sea. Once a hot-spot for the fishing industry, it now lays as barren land. Only a small portion of the original Sea remains, it is now only a lake. This was caused by the re-location of water by the Soviets in 1969. They had decided to grow “white gold” (cotton), and used the seas water resources to do so. Displacement of the water stopped the natural cycle, and the sea has not been able to replenish. This is also happening closer to home. Building of dams stops water resources from carrying nutrients, as well as the shipment and distribution of bottled water. Industries are taking water from their natural inhabitants and leaving the soil barren. In order to send water to a place like Arizona, you must ship it there. However, since the land is dry the water will not go back into their eco system. This water is lost. Since there is no water to replenish the land in its original place, the crust becomes hard and where there used to be one desert, there are now two.
   The Chinese word for water also means control. In its own this is a good metaphor. Companies are using water as a means of control, not only for local industry, but for other nations. Smaller nations like Kenya (which is also one of the driest nations) are being bullied into selling their resources cheap to get out of debt. This debt has been created by the industries who will not allow them to have tariffs, or to sell at a fair price. Using this debt, the companies are able to take the water from Kenya. Within the United corporations are using a similar method to rights activists. “Slap Suits”, which are ridiculous claims used in order to sue the activist are brought to court. While the companies know they will not win these suits, the cost for lawyers for the activist acts as a deterrent. Unfortunately this method is legal.
   Fortunately, it is still possible to stop our world’s fresh water sources from depleting. The method is not complicated like the corporate back up plan of desalination (This process involves removing the salt from the ocean water and would require large amounts of fuel, and possibly even nuclear power). The answer is simply to allow the earth to regain its natural cycle. First you would have to stop all deportation of water, and allow people to revert back to a localized system of agriculture. This means that what we use will be recycled back into the earth. Secondly, in locations which have been previously destroyed the digging of wells can force water back into the ground and re-start the natural process. This can be also done through small dams which trick the water back into the ground. This process would not be costly.

corporate control is directly related to the depletion of our global water resources. They are abusing control, and convincing governments to bend to their will. They have been terrorizing activists, as well as entire nations. Their use of our resources results in nothing but a negative, and is solely for the purpose of money. “There is enough water for human need, not human greed.” – Mahatma Ghandi. The only people benefiting from this endeavour are the CEO’s who are pocketing the sizable incomes. In fifty years, there might not be any water to fight over. In order to protect our eco-systems it seems necessary that there be global law and standards which protect natural resources from exploitation for the greed of corporations, or privatized organizations.

  1. lively-con-fess posted this